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history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
and implementation of a national high-speed rail system is one of my highest priorities. china is offering 13 types of railways and has 20 under construction. by 2020 this network will cover nearly 10,000 miles. when i looked at the title of this hearing about what mistakes have been made it seems to me one of the number one mistakes is our lack of continued commitment to high speed rail in providing adequate dollars to be able to have a true system in the united states. not only are we not investing in alternative to highway system that we are spending it on band-aids for infrastructure rather than investing in the top tier system. our president has taken bold steps and the secretary has carried that flag with us but we must provide the support to provide the additional dollars that are certainly going to be needed as mr. denham reference to get the project going. when you consider the amount of money spent on gasoline, aging infrastructure and all of the changes, certainly high speed rail must be at the forefront and when you consider federal reserve bank of san francisco reference the infrastruc
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the united states would have. we recorded almost every -- because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another brothers. they acted that way in private and they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice chairman and chairman and vice chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee. day, over a number of decades, single-handedly changed our american defense posture and they did it with skill and patriotism and knowledge of our structure that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old-school. not a bad school for
point of view was gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. with 100 inf missiles directed at them how has he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe and it was really in their interests. we now have access and have for some years to records of politburo discussions and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he rode out on the yellow pad several pages without prompting from anybody what he wanted to achieve at geneva in his first meeting. mcfarland handed this to me as we regretting it off of the plane to go to geneva saying this is what the president had on his mind. if he is wrong we will straighten him out. it was a very perceptive paper and among other things he pointed out that the biggest problems, one of these was lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we are not going to solve anything else. he also added, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev that we don't want an arms race. if he wants one he is going to lose it. an
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
kazahkstan, turkmenistan and countries all the way east to china and western europe or europe comprise an east/west axis, the corridor through which oil, gas but also industrial goods, ideas and information can flow. um, the russian situation is not dissimilar. the russian situation in europe with gas is similar to iranian or saudi situation with oil. it's all about market share. >> right. >> so if you have azerbaijanny gas, turkmen gas competing with european gas or russian gas, for that matter lng from algeria, it may drive the market share down, it may drive the prices down, and europe is really at a, at a crossroads because they need to decide whether to go with natural gas or continue with coal and continue with nuclear. so gas plays a strategic energy role in europe right now. and you asked about what can we do. >> that's the most important crux of all of -- >> trillion dollar question. we did not coordinate enough with western europe, and western europe by itself especially now with the economic crisis is not really focused enough on insuring that east/west plans will go through
, and in an hour and a half be in london riding their high-speed rail. you can move across china throughout their many provinces on high-speed rail. we do not have it. we aren't even close to it in the great united states of america. and if it's going to happen in america, it has to happen with the leadership of you, the leadership of this committee. thank you for listening to me. thank you for all the work that you do for transportation across our great country, and i am welcome to any questions. >> well, thank you. i don't think we'll question you, but i will ask fan mouse consent -- unanimous consent that ms. maloney be granted the court is si to be seated on our panel. you'll have the opportunity to participate if you like. without objection, so ordered. thank you so much for your -- >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> i'll just say two things. one, you asked about the caucus, unfortunately -- i don't make many pledges, didn't even b pledge to term limits, but that's another story. but i did make a pledge when i first ran not to join caucuses, and i actually spent part of my -- >> working gr
back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democra
is long but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india as economic, political and military powers. the obama administration has conspicuously announced a pivot to asia. at the center of this pivot is china, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9